AARP International

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We're Living Longer

Life expectancy is growing. Today we’re celebrating more centenarians than ever before, in the United States, and around the globe. Our ability to live longer, healthier, more productive lives is one of mankind’s greatest accomplishments. Consider this:

In 2010, 82.8% of all centenarians in the U.S. were female <sup>1</sup>

In 2010, 82.8% of all centenarians in the U.S. were female 1

In countries aging the best, half of 10-year-olds today may live to be 104 <sup>2</sup>

In countries aging the best, half of 10-year-olds today may live to be 104 2

70% of 8-year-olds are projected to have a living great-grandparent by 2030 <sup>3</sup>

70% of 8-year-olds are projected to have a living great-grandparent by 2030 3

The New Normal

Preparing (individually and as a society) is exciting and, in some ways, scary. It’s about moving away from a “three-stage” life—school, work, and retirement—to a more flexible one. And this “new lifetime” also comes with challenges. For starters, not everyone has an equal chance to live longer, let alone capture the associated opportunities. AARP wants to make sure that everyone has equal access to resources we all need to live longer, healthier lives.

 

Implications of Living to 100

In April 2018, AARP brought together a variety of experts and thought leaders in Washington, D.C. to discuss how we can live our best lives as they grow longer. The daylong conversation, “Disrupt Aging: Implications of Living 100”, was a forum for some 400 attendees, including business leaders, health professionals and entrepreneurs to understand what it will mean for society when it becomes commonplace to live to 100 and beyond. What those in attendance heard from speakers such as personal finance guru Suze Orman, journalist Ann Curry and best-selling author Cheryl Strayed was the importance of cultivating close relationships, continuing to learn and making retirement savings last.   

 

DISRUPT AGING: FAMILY REUNION

What if you knew you had a good chance of becoming a centenarian? How would that change how you view your life? AARP asked that question when a rare reunion brought together five generations of the Newcomer family – from 107-year-old Ike to 1-year-old Knox. The family reflected on relationships, history and the future. As Ike’s 43-year-old grandson said, “To look at somebody like Ike and know that he is living now at 108, not only healthy and active … it’s very inspirational.”

 

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